Samsung announces HomeSync, dual-core Android TV box

Samsung introduced a new Android-powered set-top box at the Mobile World Congress this week. It is an unlikely event to show a box television, but that has not stopped the Korean electronics giant to unveil the box HomeSync.

The company says the device provides a cloud house to store, share and stream content to multiple devices. The HomeSynch lets you stream videos, photos and applications from your wireless device to your television Galaxy. The device can also access the store to download Google Play your own applications and you can still use your smartphone to control the box.

002Samsung_Homesync_35619600_610x436
The device is powered by a 1.7GHz dual-core processor along with 1GB of RAM and 8 GB of solid state storage. There is also a 1 TB hard drive in the traditional tap, Bluetooth 4.0, 802.11n 2.4GHz and 5GHz, Gigabit Ethernet, optical audio and HDMI 1.4 outputs. Samsung says the device can support up to eight user accounts, each password protected and encrypted for privacy and security.

Interestingly, despite the fact that it has all the features you find with Google TV, there is no mention that the real mark anywhere on company literature or real cash. At least one publication believes that Samsung may simply be trying to distance himself from a brand that has never really been able to achieve stardom.

We are told that HomeSync will be released pre-installed with Android 4.2 Jelly Bean. Samsung said the unit will be available for purchase starting in April in the U.S. before expanding to other regions. Pricing remains unknown at this time.

Advertisements

Ubuntu dev preview for Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 4 coming next week

Ubuntu desktop and phone-580-75

In January, Canonical teased a version of the Ubuntu software for Galaxy Nexus smartphones would be released sometime in February. The new operating system was announced just before CES, revealing Canonical’s intent to bring the full range of desktop capabilities to compatible smartphones. Canonical has primarily used the Galaxy Nexus as its test device thus far, and it wasn’t that shocking to learn a developer version of Ubuntu would be handed out so soon. However, the developer just revealed a version of Ubuntu for Nexus 4 would arrive with the Galaxy Nexus edition, which comes as a bit of a nice surprise. Set to arrive on Feb. 21, the touch developer preview of Ubuntu for both Nexus smartphones will provide images and open source code for more savvy users to mess around with while they wait for a completed version. The idea is to give Ubuntu enthusiasts and developers a chance to see what the OS has to offer, and give an early lead on potential app creation for the smartphone software.Canonical will also release tools to help users flash their existing devices to the developer preview, which would allow them to stay up to date with the most current version.Attendees of Mobile World Congress can bring their Galaxy Nexus and Nexus 4 smartphones to the Canonical booth, where the developer will flash the devices themselves.Additionally at MWC, Canonical will have a variety of Ubuntu devices on display (including a possible tablet), though the actual proprietary phones aren’t expected to arrive until October.”Our platform supports a wide range of screen sizes and resolutions. Developers who have experience bringing up phone environments will find it relatively easy to port Ubuntu to current handsets,” said Canonical’s Pat McGowan in a statement. “We look forward to adding support for additional devices for everyday testing and experimentation. “The group has also created downloadable app design guidelines, giving potential developers the power to create for the full range of Ubuntu platforms. Though iOS and Android have dominated the market thus far, there’s plenty of room for a possible third option as Windows Phone 8 and BlackBerry 10 have yet to assert themselves in the marketplace. Whether that OS is Ubutnu will largely depend on how quickly and easily users are able to assimilate the open source software.

(credit: TechRadar)