CES postscript: The touch laptop, like it or not

Touch is coming in a big way to Windows 8 laptops. And if Intel has its druthers, pretty much everything coming down the pike will be touch-capable.

Intel showing off touch laptops and desktops at CES.

Intel showing off touch laptops and desktops at CES.

(Credit: Brooke Crothers)

The handset has been reinvented at CES.
Or maybe I should say that there was a vigorous attempt to reinvent the laptop. Why do not you know how to touch the success was not until this time next year.

Intel Booth CES – still a strong presence in CES Centre Hall – had a basic message unmistakable touch has arrived.
Windows 8 convertible detachables, touch-screen laptops and tablets only simple to Hewlett-Packard, Dell, Samsung, Acer, Asus, Lenovo, Toshiba, Sony, and others covered Intel booth.And just to make sure that the message was crystal clear touch, Intel issued an edict to the partners of PC during his keynote CES: all new generation ultrabooks based on its chip “Haswell” must be touch.

What does it mean for consumers? Your laptop will probably be next touch, whether you like it or not.And based on what I’ve seen at the Intel booth (and other booths, such as Samsung), this is the way it breaks down:
Convertible: Convertible, like the HP EliteBook and Lenovo Yoga Revolution, have touch screens that swivel can not be detached from the group.

The important thing to remember is that the Intel processor and related electronics are still under the keyboard, so these systems tend to be higher performance because the design offers more chances to keep the processor cool.

Removable: This is essentially tablets with well integrated keyboard docks. They include the new Lenovo ThinkPad Helix, HP Envy x2, and ATIV Samsung Smart PC.
Detachables put the electronic processor behind the screen. And that usually forces the PC manufacturers to use a low efficiency, power chip more efficient as Intel’s “Clover Trail” Atom.

One of the few exceptions to this rule is the Helix ThinkPad, which manages to cram a mainstream Intel Ivy Bridge chip in a tablet.
And by the way, Intel is now trying to get PC makers to do more. It’s just begun shipping a new series Y Ivy Bridge processor which is more power efficient than the Helix.
However, the battery life is not great, and Ivy Bridge chips – even the most power-efficient ones – still need fans to keep them cool.

Touch-screen laptop: This is a traditional clamshell laptop with a touch screen. There are already a lot of them out there, including the Sony Vaio T13 Series, Acer Aspire S7, the Asus VivoBook X202E, and the HP TouchSmart Spectre XT.

And they expect a lot more. Maybe by the end of next year, the preponderance of laptops on display at your local Best Buy will have touch screen.
Tablet: And then there are devices that are marketed as standalone Windows 8 tablets. These include ElitePad 900 HP and Dell Latitude 10 tablet.

Tablets that can run the full version of Windows 8 (Intel-based) and Windows tablets RT (based on ARM chips) offer good battery life and a lightweight and slim design, but it is very fast. That is, do not expect them to multitask Microsoft Office, Photoshop, and other demanding applications without taking the device to its knees.

Not every laptop will touch, of course. High-end gaming lappies and corporate laptops will be available with non-touch screens for the near future. But I suspect that, in the end, they will touch.

Dell's XPS 10 Windows RT detachable, based on a Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processor, was on display at Qualcomm's CES booth. Intel's edict that all future 4th Generation Core-based 'Haswell' Windows 8 laptops be touch is already an imperative on Windows RT.

Dell’s XPS 10 Windows RT detachable, based on a Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processor, was on display at Qualcomm’s CES booth. Intel’s edict that all future 4th Generation Core-based ‘Haswell’ Windows 8 laptops be touch is already an imperative on Windows RT.

(Credit: Brooke Crothers)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s